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Recoding Relationality: Indigenous New Media and the Possibility of a Critical Digital Humanities

The below is a transcript of a talk given at the University of Melbourne in December 2018. Melbourne Talk (Slides in PDF) Watch a recording of the talk here I want to begin by acknowledging the Kulin territory that these events are taking place on. It’s my first time on this land and I am […]

Love and Reconciliation Between Being and Non-Being

Belcourt’s inaugural poetry collection, This World is a Wound, which won the 2018 Griffin Poetry Prize, is a profound and probing explication of (non)existence for queer Indigenous bodies in the violent wake of settler colonialism: “colonialism broke us,” Belcourt writes in this collection, “and we’re still trying to figure out how to love and / […]

Theatre of Regret Now Available in Paperback

The Theatre of Regret: Literature, Art, and the Politics of Reconciliation in Canada is now available in paperback via UBC Press. Some of the chapters were developed out of writing that I first shared on this blog. For instance the post “Reconciliation: ‘Like an Echo Turned Inside Out’” is the basis of the book’s conclusion, […]

Virtual Immersion and the (Hungry) Settler Gaze

It is an understatement to say that this hunger for resources has not abated with time. xwelítem hunger may have begun with gold, but it quickly extended to forests, the water, and of course the land itself. In the twentieth century the hunger has grown for Indigenous artistic practice. Dylan Robinson, Hungry Listening Both my […]

How to Improve Your Online Instruction

  As a final, “in-class,” assignment, the students in my knowledge dissemination course were charged with brainstorming 3 things they wished instructors would improve on in their online teaching. They were then asked to prototype a knowledge dissemination plan to best get that information to professors. They had 20 minutes. With their permission, I am […]

#CovidCampus: Tips for Better Online Teaching

Dear Colleagues, This is a short post summarizing some of the research I have done over the past few days in preparation to move my UBC classes online. I owe a debt of gratitude to all of the generous scholars who have posted materials on Twitter and elsewhere–most specifically Jacqueline Wernimont and Cathy N. Davidson […]

Indigenous Speculative Fictions Working Toward Definitions

Below are definitions of Indigenous speculative fiction brainstormed at the end of term by students in English 373: Indigenous Speculative Fiction. You can read the syllabus for that class, including the reading list that these definitions are built from, here. We began the course with this simple definition of sf: Speculative fiction uses genre conventions […]

ENGL 373: Indigenous Speculative Fiction Syllabus

Note: In the early marketing materials for this class I used a creative commons image of Marina Bay Sand and the Gardens by the Bay supertrees in Singapore. Using this image for a course like this erases Singapore’s own colonial history and the oppression of the Indigenous Malays. I have removed the image, but it may […]

What is Indigenous New Media? Listen to Recoding Relations!

Check out our 4-part audio mini-series on Indigenous new media. Produced by David Gaertner, Melissa Haberl, and Autumn Schnell. All 4 episodes available for download and streaming here.

Reconciliation: “Like an Echo Turned Inside Out”

On the penultimate page of her 2017 dystopian speculative fiction novel, The Marrow Thieves, Métis author and editor Cherie Dimaline evokes the sound of an echo as a means elucidate the reunification of two residential school surviours: The scene is significant for a number of reasons, not least of all because it contains the only […]