Tag Archives: Canadian Politics

The Theatre of Regret: Establishing the Politics of Reconciliation after World War II

An immense wave of anti-colonial and anti-imperial activity, thought, and revision has overtaken the massive edifice of Western empire, challenging it, to use Gramsci’s vivid metaphor, in a mutual siege. For the first time Westerners have been required to confront themselves not simply as the Raj but as representatives of a culture and even a […]

Andy Everson: Idle No More

The Unseemly Underbelly of Reconciliation

The following is excerpted from my current book project: Settler Reconciliation: Locating Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in “the new international morality”. Feedback and suggestions are welcome in the comments section below. Thanks for reading. This book is an examination and critique of reconciliation as it populates the post-Cold War landscape as an idealist politic. According to […]

sehtoskakew: “Aboriginal Principles of Witnessing” in the Canadian TRC

Witnessing and testimony are an essential component of every Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and the Canadian TRC is no exception. However, these key terms are ideologically loaded and have historically excluded Indigenous knowledge systems (for instance Delgamuukw v. British Columbia). While “Schedule ‘N’” (which contains the Canadian TRC mandate) gestures towards “Aboriginal principles of witnessing,” there […]

Apology’s Worth It: How Canada Profits from Apology

We live in an “Age of Apology“. In a way that was unimaginable during the Cold War, “sorry” is now a primary element of intra-state politics. Some label the post-Cold War shift out of realpolitik as an indication of “the new international morality,” but apology is also a means for Nation States to recuperate and monetize “sorry”. The […]

Colonial Kettle Logic: Settler Colonialism as Wish Fulfillment

Colonial Kettle Logic (CKL) provides a new theoretical appraisal of settler colonialism based in psychoanalytic critique, situating the unconscious in the continuing history of Empire. CKL is an interwoven set of mutually exclusive arguments employed within settler colonial discourse that tacitly function to disavow violent settler histories of dispossession. The enumeration of these arguments illustrates precisely what […]