Tag Archives: Canada

The Deconstructive Apology: The Ethics of Apology in the Postmodern Era

At this present moment it must be recognized that “apology” has been reformulated in Canada’s political discourse as a means to control narrative and protect the interests of the status quo. In this post, I would like to offer a brief critique of what might be called the “deconstructive” or “postmodern” approach to apology, which […]

Apology’s Worth It: How Canada Profits from Apology

We live in an “Age of Apology“. In a way that was unimaginable during the Cold War, “sorry” is now a primary element of intra-state politics. Some label the post-Cold War shift out of realpolitik as an indication of “the new international morality,” but apology is also a means for Nation States to recuperate and monetize “sorry”. The […]

Colonial Kettle Logic: Settler Colonialism as Wish Fulfillment

Colonial Kettle Logic (CKL) provides a new theoretical appraisal of settler colonialism based in psychoanalytic critique, situating the unconscious in the continuing history of Empire. CKL is an interwoven set of mutually exclusive arguments employed within settler colonial discourse that tacitly function to disavow violent settler histories of dispossession. The enumeration of these arguments illustrates precisely what […]