Category Indigenous Literature

Reconciliation: “Like an Echo Turned Inside Out”

On the penultimate page of her 2017 dystopian speculative fiction novel, The Marrow Thieves, Métis author and editor Cherie Dimaline evokes the sound of an echo as a means elucidate the reunification of two residential school surviours: The scene is significant for a number of reasons, not least of all because it contains the only […]

Welcome to the Desert of Reconciliation

An excerpt from my forthcoming book The Theatre of Regret: Troubling Reconciliation in Canada. Available soon from UBC Press.

Submit to Novel Alliances

All too often we write papers, hand them in or deliver them at a poorly attended conference, and then leave them to collect digital dust on our laptops. Novel Alliances began as a space to honour the labour we, as students and teachers, put into research and pedagogy. We invite submissions on Indigenous issues circulating around […]

The Theatre of Regret: Establishing the Politics of Reconciliation after World War II

An immense wave of anti-colonial and anti-imperial activity, thought, and revision has overtaken the massive edifice of Western empire, challenging it, to use Gramsci’s vivid metaphor, in a mutual siege. For the first time Westerners have been required to confront themselves not simply as the Raj but as representatives of a culture and even a […]

“What’s A Story Like You Doing In A Place Like This?”: Cyberspace and Indigenous Futurism

For many uninformed readers Indigenous Science Fiction (sf) is an oxymoron. It isn’t simply that these readers balk at the thought of an Indigenous person in outer space (although these representations are few and far between in mainstream media); when it comes to intersections of indigeneity and techne, the stumbling block often comes much earlier. […]

“Doughnut holes”: Nalo Hopkinson, Speculative Fiction and the State of Exception

“‘How do you mean, ‘doughnut hole’?’ Ti-Jeanne had asked. ‘That’s what they call it when an inner city collapses and people run into the suburbs” (Brown Girl in the Ring 11). Nalo Hopkinson’s Brown Girl in the Ring is an award-winning, speculative fiction novel with a plot structured around the Teme-Augama First Nations land claims battle. The founding […]

Traditional Innovation: The Turn to a Decolonial New Media Studies

As a teacher, one of the core issues I run up against with my students in Indigenous literature and Indigenous studies classes is what Thomas King calls “the Dead Indian” (55): the fallacious notion that Indigenous culture is not authentic if it intersects with the present or the future. Unfortunately, the fallacy of the dead […]