Tag Archives: Indigenous studies

Submit to Novel Alliances

All too often we write papers, hand them in or deliver them at a poorly attended conference, and then leave them to collect digital dust on our laptops. Novel Alliances began as a space to honour the labour we, as students and teachers, put into research and pedagogy. We invite submissions on Indigenous issues circulating around […]

Guest Post: First Nations and Indigenous Studies 310 Collective Statement of Learning

The below post was written collectively by the students of UBC’s First Nations and Indigenous Studies theory seminar (FNIS 310), led by Matthew Wildcat. The following was written during two weeks of class time in November and December 2015. First Nations and Indigenous Studies (FNIS) 310 is the theory seminar for FNIS majors and minors. […]

Andy Everson: Idle No More

The Unseemly Underbelly of Reconciliation

The following is excerpted from my current book project: Settler Reconciliation: Locating Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in “the new international morality”. Feedback and suggestions are welcome in the comments section below. Thanks for reading. This book is an examination and critique of reconciliation as it populates the post-Cold War landscape as an idealist politic. According to […]

Indigenous Protocol in Cyberspace: Hospitality and Kevin Lee Burton’s God’s Lake Narrows

In 2010 Kevin Lee Burton (Swampy Cree) and Caroline Monnet (Algonquin) unveiled RESERVE(d) to the Winnipeg arts scene. RESERVE(d) welcomed “northern” guests into the homes of the residents of God’s Lake Narrows, a remote, Indigenous community 550km outside of Winnipeg (only accessible by plane or boat and only then during good weather conditions). The installation […]

sehtoskakew: “Aboriginal Principles of Witnessing” in the Canadian TRC

Witnessing and testimony are an essential component of every Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) and the Canadian TRC is no exception. However, these key terms are ideologically loaded and have historically excluded Indigenous knowledge systems (for instance Delgamuukw v. British Columbia). While “Schedule ‘N’” (which contains the Canadian TRC mandate) gestures towards “Aboriginal principles of witnessing,” there […]

Colonial Kettle Logic: Settler Colonialism as Wish Fulfillment

Colonial Kettle Logic (CKL) provides a new theoretical appraisal of settler colonialism based in psychoanalytic critique, situating the unconscious in the continuing history of Empire. CKL is an interwoven set of mutually exclusive arguments employed within settler colonial discourse that tacitly function to disavow violent settler histories of dispossession. The enumeration of these arguments illustrates precisely what […]