Category Teaching

On Wonderworks and Indigenous World-Building: A Travel Guidebook Assignment for Darcy Little Badger’s Elatsoe

This in-class exercise is based on Darcy Little Badger’s novel Elatsoe and chapter four of Daniel Heath Justice’s Why Indigenous Literatures Matter Indigenous wonderworks are neither strictly “fantasy” nor “realism,” but maybe both at once, or something else entirely, although they generally push against the expectations of rational materialism. They rooted in the specificities of […]

Using DH in Indigenous Studies Classrooms: Six Sample Assignments

In an interview with Liza Yeager, Anishinaabe comedian, writer, and media maker, Ryan McMahon talks about why he thinks podcasting is specifically useful medium for Indigenous storytellers: “I just think the medium is so exciting. It’s relatively inexpensive to produce; it’s a flexible creative medium that allows us to be publishers, you know? At the […]

Writing in (Good) Relation: How Writing Can Build and Create Community

Composition courses can be some of the most challenging for students, particularly when they are embedded within a specific discipline. In this post, I share an open letter that I wrote for students in “Writing for Indigenous Studies” (FNIS 300), which I teach at the University of British Columbia. The year in question was particularly […]

Strategic Plans for the Apocalypse: The Marrow Thieves in the Classroom

Groups of 4-5 Assignment Framework Cherie Dimaline’s The Marrow Thieves ends with a new beginning. While capitalist-driven climate change is leading to the decimation of settler nation states (and the rapid decline of the settler population), the protagonist, French, is full of hope for the future of Indigenous peoples—particularly now that Isaac, who holds the […]

Knowledge Dissemination: Effectively Communicating Research to Public Audiences (Syllabus)

PDF available here: ASTU 260_2019 Course Description: This course is motivated by the teachers, researchers, and students that are changing the ways in which research and knowledge is shared within and beyond the academy.  Universities are not insular. As a “public good” (Nixon), universities both produce knowledge and disseminate it to the public for use […]

The Research Essay: 10 Tips for Success (and less stress)

Originally compiled for FNIS 220 These tips are for students researching creative works (e.g. poetry, novels, film, visual art, video games) in the field of Indigenous studies. After selecting your primary text (e.g. This Wound is a World, “Welcome to your authentic Indigenous experience,” A Red Girl’s Reasoning, etc.) you should: 1) Brainstorm a research question: […]

FNIS 220: Representation and Indigenous Cultural Politics

FNSP 220 explores the ways that Indigenous peoples seek to overcome the legacies of settler colonialism and claim sovereignty and self-determination through cultural production and critique. In this course, we will examine contemporary articulations of Indigenous identity, politics, and cultural traditions in the fields of literature, film, video games, and other modes of resurgent cultural […]

FNIS 300: Writing for Indigenous Studies

Click the link below for the full syllabus. In this course, we will be honing writing skills for Indigenous studies with emphasis on writing for and with community and against patriarchy, racism, and settler colonialism. Through this course, you will work towards becoming more aware of your writing process: which means being mindful (and sometimes […]