Category Indigenous Literature

“Memories and Songs”: The Work of Mourning in I Knew Two Métis Women

Gregory Scofield’s I Knew Two Métis Women mourns the loss of a mother and an aunt. The title itself, in its use of the past tense, alerts the reader to the book’s function as eulogy. The series of poems that follow re-tell the lives of two people Scofield loved, tracing the moments that make up his […]

“Language, Family, Community, Ceremony”: Decolonizing the Literary Anthology

Compared to the Social Sciences, which contends more directly with human subjects, the humanities do not have a deep relationship with research ethics–as they are developed institutionally. However, in the case of anthology compiling, a practice that has been historically connected to nation-building and citizenship, the ethics of the humanities becomes a much thornier issue, […]

Colonial Kettle Logic: Settler Colonialism as Wish Fulfillment

Nice Claim Bro “It is useless to seek this consistency anywhere except in the colonizer himself” (Albert Memmi, The Colonizer and the Colonized). As Daniel Justice has pointed out, settlers have opinions about Indigenous peoples. Many of those opinions are ill-informed, hateful, and, grounded in an unwavering certainty about identity, rights & responsibilities, authenticity, and the […]

Blue Marrow, White Page: Considering White Space in Indigenous Poetics

Almost halfway through the Coteau edition of Louise Bernice Halfe’s Blue Marrow, right before the narrator delves into her Métis history, the text is interrupted by a blank, white page (what would be page 66). At first, the page reads as an error, something that went wrong on the printing room floor. It doesn’t seem to […]