Traditional Innovation: The Turn to a Decolonial New Media Studies

Skawennati. Time Traveller 852 Face-Off As a teacher, one of the core issues I run up against with my students in Indigenous literature and Indigenous studies classes is what Thomas King calls “the Dead Indian” (55): the fallacious notion that... Read more

Gift Theory and the Settler State

French Anthropologist Marcel Mauss put gift theory into circulation long ago in 1923, but his ideas continue to make important contributions to contemporary studies in Literature, Continental Philosophy, Anthropology and, as I argue, Reconciliation Theory. Of special importance in Mauss’s... Read more

The Deconstructed Sorry: Post-Structural Ethics of Apology in the Wake of World War II

At this present moment it must be recognized that “apology” has been reformulated in Canada’s political discourse as a means to control narrative and protect the interests of the status quo. In this post, I would like to offer a... Read more

RECONCILIAITON ≠ TRANSITIONAL JUSTICE (Part II)

The relation of transitional justice to contemporary reconciliation studies is an issue that requires much more attention. Some of the most recent examples of reconciliation (Australia and Canada) have not taken place inside of a transitional justice paradigm, but are... Read more

Reconciliation Does Not Equal Transitional Justice (and other truths)

In tracing the legacy of reconciliation across Nuremberg, Yugoslavia, South Africa, Australia and Canada, there is at least one major difference in the latter two examples that demands explicit attention. Specifically, Nuremberg principles have traditionally been used to enforce measures... Read more

The Unseemly Underbelly of Reconciliation

Andy Everson: Idle No More
For more reading on reconciliation and residential schools see 20 Books that Will Change How You Think About Canada. According to Roy L. Brooks, “we have clearly entered what can be called the ‘Age of Apology’” (3). Now more than... Read more

“The Magical Power of Words”: Intersections of Content and Form in Newspaper Typography

A writer who talks about “the magical power of words” is usually a) corny and b) incapable of any such effect. But when a type designer like Joshua Darden says it, he is emphasizing the ability of letters and words... Read more

“Riding English”: Tradition and Innovation in Louise Bernice Halfe’s Blue Marrow

Louise Bernice Halfe circa the publication of the M&S edition of Blue Marrow (1998). At the beginning of the long poem Blue Marrow, âcimowinis (the keeper of the stories) imagines and introduces nôhkom Emma, a strong-willed, adventurous, grandmother whom, because of her own light... Read more

Narrative Tectonics: A Settler Scholar in Indigenous Studies

My name is David Gaertner and I live and work as a guest on the unceeded, traditional and ancestral territory of the hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ speaking Musqueam people. This is a true story of how a white guy started working in Indigenous studies.... Read more

Indigenous in Cyberspace: Hospitality and Kevin Lee Burton’s God’s Lake Narrows

Collage of interior shots from Gods Lake Narrows In 2010 Kevin Lee Burton (Swampy Cree) and Caroline Monnet (Algonquin) unveiled RESERVE(d) to the Winnipeg arts scene. RESERVE(d) welcomed “northern” guests into the homes of the residents of God’s Lake Narrows,... Read more